Paint Schoodic

We had another successful painting workshop at the Schoodic Institute in beautiful Acadia National Park. Join us in 2018!

Monday, February 6, 2012

Then there's that matter of inspiration

Deer in my brother's yard, an exercise done several years ago

This Sunday, I was doodling in church when a painting dropped full-blown into my head. That isn't common, but is always exciting. And in this case, it was fortuitous since I just finished several weeks of flailing around on the previous piece.

Where does a fully-realized idea spring from? First, a thought: in this case, a dilemma that has bedeviled me for almost a year. Then, visual input that is usually jumbling around in one’s cranium solidifies into a concept. In this case:

  1. An email sent by my pal Garrett about how big wolves really are;
  2. A painting I did several years ago as an exercise for my class on how to paint the traps between trees;
  3. A photo taken by my friend Jamie of a waterfalls near her house;
  4. William Holman Hunt’s “Our English Coasts (Strayed Sheep),” which set the light tone for the uplands.
Bold
My sketch done in church last Sunday.

When I’m painting observationally, I follow the traditional rules of alla prima painting: dark before light, big masses divided into small masses, fat over lean. When I’m painting from an interior vision, I paint indirectly, starting with a color map, and then modulating with opaque paints.


My color map.

As far as I got today. Tomorrow, I'll start looking at real reference.

BTW, this is my current easel setup—electronic reference to the left, paper reference to the left.



2 comments:

Painting for Fun said...

Oh WOW I love this Carol!!! Excellent painting. I wish you were much closer.

Carol L. Douglas said...

Thanks, Ms. P. That goes both ways, of course.